PompeiiinPictures

Pompeii. Street Altar at I.12.5.

 

Street shrine or niche outside I.12.5 Pompeii. September 2005. This is on Via dell’ Abbondanza, at the corner with Vicolo dei Fuggiaschi. According to Della Corte, on the red pilaster which ended the insula on the east side, two electoral programmes were found.
The first – GAVIVM II VIR. The second was immediately below the first  - AMPLIATUM  L F AED
                                                                                                                  VICINI                                                                                                           
                                                                                                             SVRGITE ET
                                                                                                             ROGATE
                                                                                                             LVTATI F[ac]     
The text was placed towards the right, because the pilaster was interrupted in the middle by a rectangular niche. In the niche was fixed a coarse, rough stone resembling the outline of a human head, not the usual marble bust, as often seen here and there in the street.
See Notizie di Scavi, 1914, (p.204). According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de), these are numbered CIL IV 7442 and CIL IV 7443.

Street shrine or niche outside I.12.5 Pompeii. September 2005.

This is on Via dell’ Abbondanza, at the corner with Vicolo dei Fuggiaschi.

According to Della Corte, on the red pilaster which ended the insula on the east side, two electoral programmes were found.

The first -

GAVIVM II VIR.      [CIL IV 7442]

 

The second -

AMPLIATVM L F AED

        VICINI

        SVRGITE ET
        ROGATE

        LVTATI F[ac]       [CIL IV 7443]

 

The first line of the second inscription had larger letters than the subsequent lines.

The text was placed towards the right, because the pilaster was interrupted in the middle by a rectangular niche.

In the niche was fixed a coarse rough stone resembling the outline of a human head, not the usual marble bust, as often seen here and there in the street.

See Notizie degli Scavi, 1914, (p.204).

 

According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de), these read

 

Gavium

IIvir(um)      [CIL IV 7442]

 

Ampliatum L(uci) f(ilium) aed(ilem)

Vicini

surgite et

rogate

lutati f[ac(iatis)]      [CIL IV 7443]

 

Street altar outside I.12.5, Pompeii. September 2005. Looking south.

Street altar outside I.12.5, Pompeii. September 2005. Looking south.

 

altar 11207 Genot

Street altar outside I.12.5, Pompeii. October 2011. Looking south. Photo courtesy of Daniel Genot.

 

Street altar outside I.12.5, Pompeii. 1959. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J59f0549
                            
According to PPM, inserted in the rectangular niche on the left side of the doorway was a blue lava stone, which had been a “lava-bomb” erupted during a prehistoric eruption and which was supposed to have been attributed with sacred and magical values. 
This was inserted into an apsed rectangular niche, with the lower level consisting of a tile projecting by about 6 cm and closed into the upper area by another tile with architrave under a flat arch in brick. 
See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici. Vol. II.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana. (p.736)

Street altar outside I.12.5, Pompeii. 1959. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J59f0549

                           

According to PPM, inserted in the rectangular niche on the left side of the doorway was a blue lava stone, which had been a “lava-bomb” erupted during a prehistoric eruption and which was supposed to have been attributed with sacred and magical values.

This was inserted into an apsed rectangular niche, with the lower level consisting of a tile projecting by about 6 cm and closed into the upper area by another tile with architrave under a flat arch in brick.

See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici. Vol. II.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana. (p.736)

 

 

 

 

The low resolution pictures on this site are copyright © of Jackie and Bob Dunn and MAY NOT IN ANY CIRCUMSTANCES BE USED FOR GAIN OR REWARD COMMERCIALLY. On concession of the Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo - Parco Archeologico di Pompei. It is declared that no reproduction or duplication can be considered legitimate without the written authorization of the Parco Archeologico di Pompei.

Le immagini fotografiche a bassa risoluzione pubblicate su questo web site sono copyright © di Jackie e Bob Dunn E NON POSSONO ESSERE UTILIZZATE, IN ALCUNA CIRCOSTANZA, PER GUADAGNO O RICOMPENSA COMMERCIALMENTE. Su concessione del Ministero dei Beni e delle Attività Culturali e del Turismo - Parco Archeologico di Pompei. Si comunica che nessun riproduzione o duplicazione può considerarsi legittimo senza l'autorizzazione scritta del Parco Archeologico di Pompei.

Ultimo aggiornamento - Last updated: 13-Nov-2018 21:49