PompeiiinPictures

Pompeii. Two altars at the Porta Vesuvio.

 

Two altars at Pompeii Vesuvian Gate. 1906 plan. According to Sogliano, the gate, like the Porta Stabia consists of three parts. The passage A is 4.65m wide and 10.20m long. A second narrower passage B followed, measuring 3.65m wide by 5.15m long, with the eastern side missing entirely. After this second passage, the gate forms a tapering vestibule C, 5.10m wide and 6.10m long. The eastern wall is quite destroyed. In the south-west corner of the vestibule C there was a masonry altar [d on the plan] with edges in relief and dressed entirely in plaster and with a painted representation now completely unrecognizable. Next to this altar there was another [e on the plan], much smaller, also with an edge in relief. They were certainly devoted to worship of Lari Pubblici and to the guardian deity of the gate, whose representations would have been painted on the walls, in which the two altars were huddled. See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1906, p. 97-100.

Two altars at Pompeii Vesuvian Gate. 1906 plan.

According to Sogliano, the gate, like the Porta Stabia consists of three parts.

The passage A is 4.65m wide and 10.20m long.

A second narrower passage B followed, measuring 3.65m wide by 5.15m long, with the eastern side missing entirely.

After this second passage, the gate forms a tapering vestibule C, 5.10m wide and 6.10m long. The eastern wall is quite destroyed.

In the south-west corner of the vestibule C there was a masonry altar [d on the plan] with edges in relief and dressed entirely in plaster and with a painted representation now completely unrecognizable.

Next to this altar there was another [e on the plan], much smaller, also with an edge in relief.

They were certainly devoted to worship of Lari Pubblici and to the guardian deity of the gate, whose representations would have been painted on the walls, in which the two altars were huddled.

See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1906, p. 97-100.

 

Two altars at Pompeii Vesuvian Gate. July 2003. According to Sogliano, the altars were in the south-west corner of the vestibule C, in a small recess just north of the gate stones.
One larger altar was in the wider part of the recess [d on the plan]. This would be the recess behind where the three large blocks are. Next to this altar was another much smaller altar [e on the plan], in a narrow part to the right (north) at the rear. This would be by the two small blocks with the upright stone next to them. See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1906, p. 97-100.

Two altars at Pompeii Vesuvian Gate. July 2003.

According to Sogliano, the altars were in the south-west corner of the vestibule C, in a small recess just north of the gate stones.

One larger altar was in the wider part of the recess [d on the plan].

This would be the recess behind where the three large blocks are.

Next to this altar was another much smaller altar [e on the plan], in a narrow part to the right (north) at the rear.

This would be by the two small blocks with the upright stone next to them.

See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1906, p. 97-100.

 

Two altars at Pompeii Vesuvian Gate. May 2006. Looking across vestibule C to recess which had two altars.

Two altars at Pompeii Vesuvian Gate. May 2006. Looking across vestibule C to recess which had two altars.

 

Two altars at Pompeii Vesuvian Gate. September 2011. West wall of gate and site of two altars. According to Sogliano, the larger altar was in the wider part of the recess [d on the plan]. It had edges in relief and was dressed entirely in plaster and with a painted representation which was completely unrecognizable. Next to this altar there was another [e on the plan], in a narrow part to the right (north) at the rear. It was much smaller, and also had an edge in relief. They were certainly devoted to worship of Lari Pubblici and to the guardian deity of the gate, whose representations would have been painted on the walls, in which the two altars were huddled. See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1906, p. 97-100.
The three gate stones can be seen on the ground to the left. Detail from photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

Two altars at Pompeii Vesuvian Gate. September 2011.

West wall of gate and site of two altars.

According to Sogliano, the larger altar was in the wider part of the recess [d on the plan].

It had edges in relief and was dressed entirely in plaster and with a painted representation which was completely unrecognizable.

Next to this altar there was another [e on the plan], in a narrow part to the right (north) at the rear.

It was much smaller, and also had an edge in relief.

They were certainly devoted to worship of Lari Pubblici and to the guardian deity of the gate, whose representations would have been painted on the walls, in which the two altars were huddled.

See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1906, p. 97-100.

The three gate stones can be seen on the ground to the left.

Detail from photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

Two altars at Pompeii Vesuvian Gate. June 2012. West wall of gate and site of two altars.

Two altars at Pompeii Vesuvian Gate. June 2012.

West wall of gate and site of two altars.

 

 

Two altars at Pompeii Vesuvian Gate. May 2006. Looking across gate to remains of west side. The two altars [d and e on the plan] were in a small area, where the three stones are piled in the centre of this picture.

Two altars at Pompeii Vesuvian Gate. May 2006. Looking across gate to remains of west side.

The two altars [d and e on the plan] were in a small area, where the three stones are piled in the centre of this picture.

 

Two altars at Pompeii Vesuvian Gate. September 2011. Looking across gate to west side and site of two altars. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

Two altars at Pompeii Vesuvian Gate. September 2011.

Looking across gate to west side and site of two altars.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.