PompeiiinPictures

Pompeii. Porta di Stabia or Stabian Gate. Excavated c.1869.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2010. North side. Looking south. Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2010. Looking south from north side.

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2005. Looking south from north side. 
According to Eschebach, the ancient name of this gate may have been Porta Portuensis?  See Eschebach, L., 1993. Gebäudeverzeichnis und Stadtplan der antiken Stadt Pompeji. Köln: Böhlau. (p.11)

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2005. Looking south from north side.

According to Eschebach, the ancient name of this gate may have been Porta Portuensis?

See Eschebach, L., 1993. Gebäudeverzeichnis und Stadtplan der antiken Stadt Pompeji. Köln: Böhlau. (p.11)

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. Photograph c. 1936 by Tatiana Warscher. Looking from the Via Stabiana to the Porta Stabia. See Warscher T., 1936. Codex Topographicus Pompeianus Regio I.1, I.5. Rome:DAIR. No. 10.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. Photograph c. 1936 by Tatiana Warscher.

Looking from the Via Stabiana to the Porta Stabia.

See Warscher T., 1936. Codex Topographicus Pompeianus Regio I.1, I.5. Rome:DAIR. No. 10.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate.  North side.   March 2009.  Looking south with fountain centre and drainage to right.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. March 2009. North side.

Looking south with fountain in centre and drainage, to right of fountain.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate.  September 2005.  North side.  Drainage.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2005. Drainage on north side.

 

East side of Stabian Gate. Steps leading up to top of city walls, looking south onto wall. Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

East side of Stabian Gate. September 2010.

Steps leading up to top of city walls, looking south onto wall.

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate.  May 2006.  Looking south.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. May 2006. Looking south through gate.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate.  September 2005.  Looking south.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2005. Looking south through gate.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate.  September 2005.  Plaster on west side.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2005. Plaster on west side.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2004. Looking south on Via Stabiana.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2004. Looking south towards gate, from Via Stabiana.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. 1957. Looking south along the Via Stabiana. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
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Pompeii Stabian Gate. 1957. Looking south along the Via Stabiana.

Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

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Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2010. South side. Looking north to Via Stabiana. Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2010. Looking north to Via Stabiana from south side.

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate.  May 2006.  South side.  Looking north.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. May 2006. Looking north from south side.

 

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Pompeii Stabian Gate. May 2006. South-east side.

Looking north to Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus.

 

Porta di Stabia. Early 20th century. Looking north to Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus. Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

Porta di Stabia. Early 20th century. Looking north to Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus.

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

Pompeii Porta di Stabia or Stabian Gate. About 1900. Looking north through gate from outside the city. The north end of the schola tomb of Marcus Tullius can be seen on the right. Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

Pompeii Porta di Stabia or Stabian Gate. About 1900. Looking north through gate from outside the city.

The north end of the schola tomb of Marcus Tullius can be seen on the right.

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. Vase found c.1910 in front of the Porta Stabia. See Warscher T., 1936. Codex Topographicus Pompeianus Regio I.1, I.5. Rome:DAIR. No. 4. See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1910, p. 568.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. Vase found c.1910 in front of the Porta Stabia.

See Warscher T., 1936. Codex Topographicus Pompeianus Regio I.1, I.5. Rome:DAIR. No. 4.

See Notizie degli Scavi di Antichità, 1910, p. 568.

 

Pompeii Porta di Stabia or Stabian Gate. 1890-1900. Looking north through gate from outside the city. Looking north past the Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus. 
Photo courtesy of British School at Rome Digital Collections. See http://www.bsrdigitalcollections.it/details.aspx?ID=15505&ST=SS

Pompeii Porta di Stabia or Stabian Gate. 1890-1900. Looking north through gate from outside the city.

Looking north past the Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus.

Photo courtesy of British School at Rome Digital Collections.

See http://www.bsrdigitalcollections.it/details.aspx?ID=15505&ST=SS

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2010. Looking north to Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus. Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2010.

Looking north to Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus.

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate.  March 2009.  South east side.  Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. March 2009. South-east side.

Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. Photograph c. 1936 by Tatiana Warscher. Looking north past the Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus to the Porta Stabia. See Warscher T., 1936. Codex Topographicus Pompeianus Regio I.1, I.5. Rome:DAIR. No. 1.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. Photograph c. 1936 by Tatiana Warscher.

Looking north past the Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus to the Porta Stabia.

See Warscher T., 1936. Codex Topographicus Pompeianus Regio I.1, I.5. Rome:DAIR. No. 1.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2010. South east side. 
Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus.
Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

The Cippus at the Stabian Gate has the following inscription:-

L - AVIANVS - L - F - MEN
FLACCVS - PONTIANVS
Q - SPEDIVS - Q - F - MEN
FIRMVS - II - VIR - I - D - VIAM
A - MILLIARIO - A - D - GISIARIOS
QVA - TERRITORIVM - EST
POMPEIANORVM - SVA
PEC - MVNIERVNT

Lucius Avianius Flaccus Pontianus, son of Lucius, of the Menenian tribe and Quintus Spedius Firmus, 
son of Quintus, of the Menenian tribe, duumvirs with judicial power, 
paved the road at their own expense from the milestone to the station of the carriage drivers, 
where it is in Pompeii’s territory. (CIL.X1064 – ILS 5382)

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2010. South-east side.

Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus.

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

The Cippus at the Stabian Gate has the following inscription:-

 

L - AVIANVS - L - F - MEN

FLACCVS - PONTIANVS

Q - SPEDIVS - Q - F - MEN

FIRMVS - II - VIR - I - D - VIAM

A - MILLIARIO - A - D - GISIARIOS

QVA - TERRITORIVM - EST

POMPEIANORVM - SVA

PEC - MVNIERVNT

 

The Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de) lists this as

L(ucius) Avianius L(uci) f(ilius) Men(enia) / Flaccus Pontianus / Q(uintus) Spedius Q(uinti) f(ilius) Men(enia) / Firmus IIvir(i) i(ure) d(icundo) viam / a milliario ad cisiarios / qua territorium est / Pompeianorum sua / pec(unia) munierunt    [CIL X 1064]

 

Lucius Avianius Flaccus Pontianus, son of Lucius, of the Menenian tribe and Quintus Spedius Firmus, son of Quintus, of the Menenian tribe, duumvirs with judicial power, paved the road at their own expense from the milestone to the station of the carriage drivers, where it is in Pompeii’s territory.

See Cooley, A. and M.G.L., 2004. Pompeii: A Sourcebook. London: Routledge. p. 127, F86.  (CIL X 1064 – ILS 5382)

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. Photograph c. 1936 by Tatiana Warscher. Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus. See Warscher T., 1936. Codex Topographicus Pompeianus Regio I.1, I.5. Rome:DAIR. No. 2.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. Photograph c. 1936 by Tatiana Warscher.

Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus.

See Warscher T., 1936. Codex Topographicus Pompeianus Regio I.1, I.5. Rome:DAIR. No. 2.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. May 2006. South east side. Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus. The Cippus at the Stabian Gate has the following inscription:-

L - AVIANVS - L - F - MEN
FLACCVS - PONTIANVS
Q - SPEDIVS - Q - F - MEN
FIRMVS - II - VIR - I - D - VIAM
A - MILLIARIO - A - D - GISIARIOS
QVA - TERRITORIVM - EST
POMPEIANORVM - SVA
PEC - MVNIERVNT

Lucius Avianius Flaccus Pontianus, son of Lucius, of the Menenian tribe and Quintus Spedius Firmus, son of Quintus, of the Menenian tribe, duumvirs with judicial power, paved the road at their own expense from the milestone to the station of the carriage drivers, where it is in Pompeii’s territory. (CIL.X1064 – ILS 5382)

Pompeii Stabian Gate. May 2006. South-east side.

Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate.  May 2006. Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. May 2006. Cippus of L. Avianius Flaccus and Q. Spedius Firmus.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. May 2006. South west side. Near here on the 11th October 1889, “at approximately 10 metres if you are exiting and turn to the right’ were two bodies, a man and a woman lying side by side. Salvatore Cozzi made two plaster casts. See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p. 193-4, Figg. 451-3).

Pompeii Stabian Gate. May 2006. South-west side.

Near here on the 11th October 1889, “at approximately 10 metres if you are exiting and turn to the right’ were two bodies, a man and a woman lying side by side.

Salvatore Cozzi made two plaster casts.

See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p. 193-4, Figg. 451-3).

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. Old postcard of victims numbered 14 and 15. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. Old postcard of victims numbered 14 and 15. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2015. Plaster cast of supine man, numbered 13 or 14.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2015. Plaster cast of supine man, numbered 13 or 14.

Exhibits from the Summer 2015 exhibition in the amphitheatre.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2015. Plaster cast of supine man, numbered 13 or 14, see below.  Exhibit from the Summer 2015 exhibition in the amphitheatre.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2015. Plaster cast of supine man, numbered 13 or 14, see explanation below.

Exhibit from the Summer 2015 exhibition in the amphitheatre.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. December 2006. Forum Granary store. Plaster cast of body. Garcia y Garcia describes a mature man, already old, but perhaps still vigorous, fallen on his back, wrapped in a wide cape, with hands on his chest and with slightly drawn up legs. He had a fine aquiline nose and a smile was on his lips. On the right leg was a circular ring that denoted a slave. This plaster cast was obtained outside the Stabian Gate on the 11th October 1889, at approximately 10 metres if you are exiting and turn to the right. A plaster cast was also made of a woman who was found next to this man. See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p. 193-4, Figg. 451-3). According to Dwyer, this plaster cast was of victim number 14.  See Dwyer, E., 2010. Pompeii’s Living Statues. Univ. of Michigan Press: (p.103)

VII.7.29 Pompeii. December 2006. Forum Granary store. Plaster cast of body, known as victim number 13.

Garcia y Garcia described a mature man, already old, but perhaps still vigorous, fallen on his back, wrapped in a wide cape, with hands on his chest and with slightly drawn up legs.

He had a fine aquiline nose and a smile was on his lips. On the right leg was a circular ring that denoted a slave.

This plaster cast was obtained outside the Stabian Gate on the 11th October 1889, at approximately 10 metres if you are exiting and turn to the right.

A plaster cast was also made of a woman who was found next to this man.

See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p. 193-4, Figg. 451-3).

According to Dwyer, this plaster cast was of victim number 14.

See Dwyer, E., 2010. Pompeii’s Living Statues. Univ. of Michigan Press: (p.103) 

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. Old undated postcard showing huiman plaster cast made on 11th October 1889, and on display in the Antiquarium in this photo. Known as victim No.13, see explanation above. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

Pompeii Stabian Gate.

Old undated postcard showing human plaster cast made on 11th October 1889, and on display in the Antiquarium in this photo.

Known as victim No.13, see explanation above. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2015. Plaster cast of victim numbered 14 (or 15?), a woman of mature age, see explanation below.  Exhibit from the Summer 2015 exhibition in the amphitheatre.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2015.

Plaster cast of victim numbered 14 (or 15?), a woman of mature age, see explanation below.

Exhibit from the Summer 2015 exhibition in the amphitheatre.

 

VII.9.7 and VII.9.8 Pompeii. July 2011. Plaster cast on display in Macellum.
Known as victim no.14, this victim was also recovered near the Stabian Gate on 11th October 1889.
See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p. 193-4, Figg. 451-3).
According to Dwyer, described as victim no. 15, this plaster cast was a woman of mature age.
She had been found laying face down on her stomach and half-clothed, her arms stretched before her.
See Dwyer, E., 2010. Pompeii’s Living Statues. Univ. of Michigan Press: (p.106-7)

VII.9.7 and VII.9.8 Pompeii. July 2011. Plaster cast on display in Macellum.

Known as victim no.14, this victim was also recovered near the Stabian Gate on 11th October 1889.

See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p. 193-4, Figg. 451-3).

According to Dwyer, described as victim no. 15, this plaster cast was a woman of mature age.

She had been found lying face down on her stomach and half-clothed, her arms stretched before her.

See Dwyer, E., 2010. Pompeii’s Living Statues. Univ. of Michigan Press: (p.106-7) 

 

Pompeii, September 2015. On display as an exhibit in the Summer 2015 exhibition in the amphitheatre. Plaster cast of victim numbered 16, found 12th March 1890 outside of the Porta Stabiana. According to NdS, 12th March 1890, following the excavation of the agger on the right going out from Porta Stabiana, at a distance of about 72 metres from the Gate, the imprint of a human body was found in the compacted layer of ash. Sig. Salvatore Cozzi directed the operation to cast the plaster-cast. The reproduction was one of the best and most successful made up until that time.
The cast represented a young slim male, lying on his left side, wrapped in a cloak and with short pants that exposed his legs below the knee. The sandal he was wearing was clearly seen on his right foot. Nothing more could be said of the left leg, because this and the hand turned out badly. Height 1.55 metres. 
See Notizie degli Scavi, 1890, p.128
See Dwyer, E., 2010. Pompeii’s Living Statues. Ann Arbor: Univ of Michigan Press. (p.107 and fig.48).

Pompeii, September 2015. On display as an exhibit in the Summer 2015 exhibition in the amphitheatre.

Plaster cast of victim numbered 16, found 12th March 1890 outside of the Porta Stabiana.

According to NdS, 12th March 1890, following the excavation of the agger on the right going out from Porta Stabiana, at a distance of about 72 metres from the Gate, the imprint of a human body was found in the compacted layer of ash. Sig. Salvatore Cozzi directed the operation to cast the plaster-cast.

The reproduction was one of the best and most successful made up until that time.

The cast represented a young slim male, lying on his left side, wrapped in a cloak and with short pants that exposed his legs below the knee.

The sandal he was wearing was clearly seen on his right foot.

Nothing more could be said of the left leg, because this and the hand turned out badly. Height 1.55 metres.

See Notizie degli Scavi, 1890, p.128

See Dwyer, E., 2010. Pompeii’s Living Statues. Ann Arbor: Univ of Michigan Press. (p.107 and fig.48).

 

Pompeii Porta di Stabia or Stabian Gate. 1890-1900. Looking south through gate. 
On the right is the tablet with the Oscan inscription, which appears fully visible. 
Photo courtesy of British School at Rome Digital Collections.
See http://www.bsrdigitalcollections.it/details.aspx?ID=15506&ST=SS

Pompeii Porta di Stabia or Stabian Gate. 1890-1900. Looking south through gate.

On the right is the tablet with the Oscan inscription, which appears fully visible.

Photo courtesy of British School at Rome Digital Collections.

See http://www.bsrdigitalcollections.it/details.aspx?ID=15506&ST=SS

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate.  March 2009.  West side.  Oscan inscription.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. March 2009. Oscan inscription on west side.

 

Reproduction of the inscription by Fiorelli. [Descrizione 1875 p. 29]. Only four of the eleven lines were visible in March 2009, with seven buried. See Pappalardo, U., 2001. La Descrizione di Pompei per Giuseppe Fiorelli (1875). Napoli: Massa Editore. P. 31

Reproduction of the inscription by Fiorelli. [Descrizione 1875 p. 29]. Only four of the eleven lines were visible in March 2009, with seven buried.

See Pappalardo, U., 2001. La Descrizione di Pompei per Giuseppe Fiorelli (1875). Napoli: Massa Editore. P. 31

 

Porta-Stabia-Oscan-inscription-1-240       Porta-Stabia-Oscan-inscri-2-240

Oscan and its Latin translation. From C. Darling Buck’s Grammar of Oscan… 1904.

Buck translated and explained this as:

The aediles [M. Sittius and N. Pontius] laid out two roads, and these as well as two others they also constructed or repaired under the direction of the meddix [oscan magistrate] of the city.

One road, leading out from the Stabian gate where the inscription was set up, they laid out at a certain width as far as the Stabian bridge.

The street leading from the same point into the city, and called, from its importance, the Via Pompeiana (now known as the Strada [Via] Stabiana), they laid out at a certain width as far as the temple of Jupiter Milichius.

The Via Iovia was doubtless named from a temple of Jupiter, and the Via Decurialis from some public building.

See Buck C. D., 1904. A Grammar Of Oscan And Umbrian. Boston: Ginn. p. 239-240.

Mau stated “….. these streets ..….. they placed in perfect repair.”

He also stated the present temple was not old enough to be the one mentioned in the inscription, but suggested it was probably standing on a much earlier edifice.

See Mau, A., 1907, translated by Kelsey F. W. Pompeii: Its Life and Art. New York: Macmillan. p. 184.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2010.. West side. Oscan inscription on marble. The inscription now has only two of its eleven lines above ground. Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2010. Oscan inscription on marble slab on west side.

The inscription now has only two of its eleven lines above ground.

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2010. East side. Two niches. Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2010. Two niches on east side.

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. Photograph c. 1936 by Tatiana Warscher. Two niches on east side. 
According to Warscher the niche was originally covered in plaster. It had the graffito PATRIA in large letters, another name for Minerva. See Warscher T., 1936. Codex Topographicus Pompeianus Regio I.1, I.5. Rome:DAIR. No. 9.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. Photograph c. 1936 by Tatiana Warscher.

Two niches on east side.

According to Warscher the niche was originally covered in plaster.

It had the graffito PATRIA in large letters, another name for Minerva.

See Warscher T., 1936. Codex Topographicus Pompeianus Regio I.1, I.5. Rome:DAIR. No. 9.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate.  March 2009.  East side.  Upper niche.

Pompeii Stabian Gate. March 2009. Upper niche on east side.

 

Pompeii Stabian Gate. March 2009. Lower niche on east side

Pompeii Stabian Gate. March 2009. Lower niche on east side

 

Porta%20Stabia%20Baker%20Picture%20194

Pompeii Stabian Gate. September 2010. Looking north onto Via Stabiana.

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

Porta di Stabia. About 1900. Looking north along Via Stabiana. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

Porta di Stabia. About 1900. Looking north along Via Stabiana. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

Porta di Stabia. About 1900. Looking north along Via Stabiana, past VIII.7 and the Theatres on left. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

Porta di Stabia. About 1900. Looking north along Via Stabiana, past VIII.7 and the Theatres on left. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

Porta Stabia. About 1869. Looking north along Via Stabiana. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

Porta di Stabia. About 1869. Looking north along Via Stabiana. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ultimo aggiornamento - Last updated: 11-Nov-2018 22:25