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I.11.16 Pompeii. Casa di Saturninus. Hospitium.

Excavated 1952-54 and 1960. 

Part 1.                                       Part 2

 

Part 3      Plan (opens in a separate window)

 

According to Miele in Rivista di Studi Pompeiani, Vol. III, 1989 (p.176-177):

“The name of the last occupant, according to Eschebach who did not give any reason why, was one Saturninus.

However, the attribution appeared wrong in that the only inscriptions read here by Della Corte on the plaster of the facades between nos.16 and 17 referred to a “Ceia”, and then more to the north, to a “Laureatus” but no better identified.

The inscriptions referring to “Saturninus” or “Saturnalis” would have been found written on the zoccolo between nos. 1 and 2 along the Via dell’Abbondanza.

The excavation, according to Maiuri, took place between the 9th and 21st July and between the 1st and 3rd September of 1960 but was never published, of which the first report of the building was in the article by Jim Packer in 1978.

Lists in the excavation diaries recorded that 3 human skeletons were found together with their belongings, a cup in Italian terra sigillata dateable between 40 and 79AD was important as it proved, according to Miele, that the house was inhabited in 79AD, even though it was in a state of refining and restructuring”.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2006. Facade. According to Packer, the walls of the facade were built of random rubblework on average between 4.00 and 5.84m in height, but the excavators had extensively restored the upper sections. One quoin faced with opus vittatum was on the south side of the entrance doorway. The facade was stuccoed and some still remains in situ. Two rows of sockets indicated that a sloping projecting roof originally shaded the facade which gained interest from a row of irregularly placed windows.
See Packer, J: Inns at Pompeii: a short survey, in Cronache Pompeiane IV-1978 (p.18-24)

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2006. Facade.

According to Packer, the walls of the facade were built of random rubblework on average between 4.00 and 5.84m in height, but the excavators had extensively restored the upper sections.

One quoin faced with opus vittatum was on the south side of the entrance doorway.

The facade was stuccoed, and some stucco remains in situ.

Two rows of sockets indicated that a sloping projecting roof originally shaded the facade which gained interest from a row of irregularly placed windows.

See Packer, J: Inns at Pompeii: a short survey, in Cronache Pompeiane IV, 1978 (p.18-24)

 

I.11.17 and I.11.16 looking north. September 2005. Front facades.

I.11.17 and I.11.16 looking north. September 2005. Front facades.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. September 2005. Entrance doorway with threshold of vesuvian lava.

I.11.16 Pompeii. September 2005. Entrance doorway with threshold of vesuvian lava.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2007. Recess in north wall next to entrance doorway.
According to Miele: the recess in the north wall near the entrance was for the evening, when the beam was placed into it as a barrier across the main doorway. - “incavo sulla parete nord in prossimita dell’entrata, in cui veniva incastrata la sera, la trave cioe posta dall’interno a sbarramento della porta principale” See Florian Miele, La casa a schiera I.11.16, un esempio di edilizia privata a Pompei  in Rivista di Studi Pompeiani, III, 1989, (pages 165-184 with figs 1-16).

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2007. Recess in north wall next to entrance doorway.

According to Miele: the recess in the north wall near the entrance was for the evening, when the beam was placed into it as a barrier across the main doorway

- “incavo sulla parete nord in prossimita dell’entrata, in cui veniva incastrata la sera, la trave cioe posta dall’interno a sbarramento della porta principale”

See Florian Miele, La casa a schiera I.11.16, un esempio di edilizia privata a Pompei in Rivista di Studi Pompeiani, III, 1989, (pages 165-184 with figs. 1-16).

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2006. Room 1, looking east along entrance corridor.
According to Packer, the fauces was floored with opus signinum, along with all the other rooms  (although he stated rooms 10-12 could not be seen because of the rubbish which concealed the floors).  The walls were found with a high black dado (zoccolo) with a red border which set off the plain white stucco walls.

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2006. Room 1, looking east along entrance corridor.

According to Packer, the fauces was floored with opus signinum, along with all the other rooms,  

although he stated rooms 10-12 could not be seen because of the rubbish which concealed the floors.

The walls were found with a high black dado (zoccolo) with a red border, which set off the plain white stucco walls.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. September 2005. North wall of entrance fauces.

I.11.16 Pompeii. September 2005. Room 1, north wall of entrance fauces.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. September 2005. Room 1, south wall of entrance fauces. On the right of the photo would be the room 2, stairs to the upper floor. According to Packer, a window which retained its ancient iron grill lit the stairs. This small window is visible on the south side of the entrance doorway in the photo of the façade. According to Packer, the stairs would have led to the area above rooms 1, 2, 4 and 5. Indications in the plaster of room 4 prove that the room above it also included the space over the fauces, room 1, and that this upper area may have been either a cubiculum or a small dining room. It certainly had at least one couch, as shown by the bed niche over the east doorway of room 4. Marks in the plaster of the west wall suggest that the space over the western half of room 5 was a single chamber lit by a window overlooking the vicolo. The plaster on the east wall demonstrated that this half of the upstairs room was divided into two small chambers, each 1.37m wide, separated by a partition 0.27m wide. The two small rooms over the east half of room 5 were both painted red.
See Packer, J: Inns at Pompeii: a short survey, in Cronache Pompeiane IV-1978 (p.18-24, see page 23, and 24).

I.11.16 Pompeii. September 2005. Room 1, south wall of entrance fauces.

On the right of the photo would be the room 2, stairs to the upper floor.

According to Packer, a window, which retained its ancient iron grill, lit the stairs.

This small window is visible on the south side of the entrance doorway in the photo of the façade.

According to Packer, the stairs would have led to the area above rooms 1, 2, 4 and 5.

Indications in the plaster of room 4 prove that the room above it also included the space over the fauces, room 1, and that this upper area may have been either a cubiculum or a small dining room. It certainly had at least one couch, as shown by the bed niche over the east doorway of room 4.

Marks in the plaster of the west wall suggest that the space over the western half of room 5 was a single chamber lit by a window overlooking the vicolo.

The plaster on the east wall demonstrated that this half of the upstairs room was divided into two small chambers, each 1.37m wide, separated by a partition 0.27m wide.

The two small rooms over the east half of room 5 were both painted red.

See Packer, J: Inns at Pompeii: a short survey, in Cronache Pompeiane IV-1978 (p.18-24, see page 23, and 24).

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 3, looking east across caupona with bar.
According to Packer, this would have been the covered atrium. Its east wall would have had two large windows and doorway to the outdoor triclinium in courtyard. Its walls were found with a black dado with a white border separating from a yellow main zone which was partitioned into rectangular panels by narrow red borders. However these paintings may have been a later redecoration applied over an earlier design which included a black main zone, some of which could be seen near to the doorway to room 7. According to Miele, this rectangular covered atrium was without an impluvium.

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 3, looking east across caupona with bar.

According to Packer, this would have been the covered atrium.

Its east wall would have had two large windows and doorway to the outdoor triclinium in courtyard.

Its walls were found with a black dado with a white border separating from a yellow main zone, which was partitioned into rectangular panels, by narrow red borders.

However, these paintings may have been a later redecoration applied over an earlier design, which included a black main zone, some of which could be seen near to the doorway to room 7.

According to Miele, this rectangular covered atrium was without an impluvium.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Looking east. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Looking east. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Looking east. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Looking east. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. 1964. Looking east across bar counter. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J64f1815

I.11.16 Pompeii. 1964. Looking east across bar counter. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J64f1815

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 1, looking north at bar counter.  According to Packer, against the north wall were three small shelves probably used for the storage of cups, glasses and beakers. Originally there were two containers embedded into the counter, but only the smallest remains in situ. In the larger opening would have been a bronze or lead container, supported  by five brick projections so as to leave space below for coals, an arrangement that was used to heat liquids. The coals were raked underneath the container through a rectangular opening reached from the low hearth attached to the south side of the counter. The counter, shelves and hearth were all stuccoed.

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 3, looking north at bar counter. 

According to Packer, against the north wall were three small shelves probably used for the storage of cups, glasses and beakers.

Originally, there were two containers embedded into the counter, but only the smallest remains in situ.

In the larger opening would have been a bronze or lead container, supported by five brick projections so as to leave space below for coals, an arrangement that was used to heat liquids.

The coals were raked underneath the container through a rectangular opening reached from the low hearth attached to the south side of the counter.

The counter, shelves and hearth were all stuccoed.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Looking north at bar counter.
Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Looking north at bar counter.

Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Looking north-west towards bar-counter. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Looking north-west towards bar-counter.

Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2015. Looking north-west towards bar. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2015. Looking north-west towards bar. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Looking north-east toward bar-counter.
Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Looking north-east toward bar-counter.

Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Looking west towards top of counter. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Looking west towards top of counter. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Looking west. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Looking west. Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. 1964. Looking east towards the larger of the two openings in the bar-counter. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J64f1813

I.11.16 Pompeii. 1964. Looking east towards the larger of the two openings in the bar-counter.

Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J64f1813

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Largest of the two openings in the bar counter.
Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Largest of the two openings in the bar counter.

Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. 1964. Room 3, looking east from hearth. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J64f1747

I.11.16 Pompeii. 1964. Room 3, looking east from hearth. 

Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J64f1747

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 6, looking north towards triclinium and two niches.  
The walls are painted with style IV garden scenes, with a black dado divided by yellow lines into a trellis pattern, and set off by a yellow border.

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 6, looking north towards triclinium and two niches. 

The walls are painted with style IV garden scenes, with a black dado divided by yellow lines into a trellis pattern, and set off by a yellow border.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Looking towards north-west corner and north wall.
Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

I.11.16 Pompeii. April 2004. Looking towards north-west corner and north wall.

Photo courtesy of Nicolas Monteix.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii, 1968. Remains of painted zoccolo on west wall in north-west corner. 
Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details. J68f1290

I.11.16 Pompeii, 1968. Remains of painted zoccolo on west wall in north-west corner.

Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J68f1290

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 6, two joined niches, in corner of room.

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 6, two joined niches, in north-west corner of room.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 6, painted trellis pattern in north-west corner.

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 6, painted trellis pattern in north-west corner.

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 6, triclinium with round and square tables.
According to Jashemski, “The courtyard (a) at the rear of the hospitium (excavated in 1960) was separated from the roofed passageway on the south by a low wall 0.62m high. Most of the courtyard was occupied by a masonry triclinium (l. medius 3.80m, l. summus 2.73m, l. imus 4.15m, table 0.80m in diameter). There was a hearth at the end of the l. summus, which measured  0.77 x 0.90m.  A garden painting on the north and east walls of the courtyard gave the area the appearance of a garden.”
See Jashemski, W. F., 1993. The Gardens of Pompeii, Volume II: Appendices. New York: Caratzas. (p.53, and p.325, and figs 375-6)

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 6, triclinium with round and square hearth.

According to Jashemski, “The courtyard (a) at the rear of the hospitium (excavated in 1960) was separated from the roofed passageway on the south by a low wall 0.62m high.

Most of the courtyard was occupied by a masonry triclinium (l. medius 3.80m, l. summus 2.73m, l. imus 4.15m, table 0.80m in diameter).

There was a hearth at the end of the l. summus, which measured 0.77m x 0.90m.

A garden painting on the north and east walls of the courtyard gave the area the appearance of a garden.”

See Jashemski, W. F., 1993. The Gardens of Pompeii, Volume II: Appendices. New York: Caratzas. (p.53, and p.325, and figs 375-6)

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. 1961. Looking south-east across courtyard towards site of roofed passageway. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J61f0239

I.11.16 Pompeii. 1961. Room 6, looking south-east across courtyard towards site of roofed passageway.   

Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J61f0239

 

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 6, triclinium and north wall.

I.11.16 Pompeii. December 2007. Room 6, triclinium and north wall, looking towards north-west corner.

 

Part 2

 

Part 3      Plan (opens in a separate window)