PompeiiinPictures

II.6 Pompeii. Anfiteatro or Amphitheatre.

First excavations 1748, then abandoned.

Completely excavated between 1813 and 1816.

 

Part:       1        2        3         4        5        6        7_

 

II.6 Pompeii. September 2005. North end of Amphitheatre.

II.6 Pompeii. September 2005. North end of Amphitheatre.

 

II.6 Pompeii. September 2005. North entrance of Amphitheatre.

II.6 Pompeii. September 2005. North entrance of Amphitheatre.

 

II.6 Pompeii. May 2010. North entrance of Amphitheatre. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

II.6 Pompeii. May 2010. North entrance of Amphitheatre. Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Amphitheatre, northern entrance.   
According to Pagano and Prisciandaro, on 29th December 1814 (PAH III, 1) 3 skeletons were found near the doorway that lead to the arena.  
Near to them were two gold armbands with head of a serpent, a bracelet, a ring with head of serpent, and a piece of chain used as a bootlace (un pezzo di cateniglia ad uso di laccettino). See Pagano, M.  and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli.  Naples : Nicola Longobardi. 
(p.110)

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Amphitheatre, northern entrance.   

According to Pagano and Prisciandaro, on 29th December 1814 (PAH III, 1), 2 skeletons were found near the doorway that lead to the arena. 

Near to them were two gold armbands with head of a serpent, a bracelet, a ring with head of serpent, and a piece of chain used as a bootlace (un pezzo di cateniglia ad uso di laccettino).

See Pagano, M.  and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli.  Naples : Nicola Longobardi. (p.110)

 

II.6 Pompeii. September 2005. North entrance of Amphitheatre.

II.6 Pompeii. September 2005. North entrance of Amphitheatre.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Large rectangular niche, on east side of corridor of Amphitheatre, which had contained a statue of city magistrates. According to Mau, the niches in the north passage were adorned with two portrait statues of Gaius Cuspius Pansa, father and son. These were placed in the niches, in the east and west walls, facing each other. The statues have disappeared but the inscriptions are still readable. See Mau, A., 1907, translated by Kelsey, F. W., Pompeii: Its Life and Art. New York: Macmillan. (p. 219).

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006.

Large rectangular niche, on east side of corridor of Amphitheatre, which had contained a statue of city magistrates.

According to Mau, the niches in the north passage were adorned with two portrait statues of Gaius Cuspius Pansa, father and son.

These were placed in the niches, in the east and west walls, facing each other.

The statues have disappeared, but the inscriptions are still readable.

See Mau, A., 1907, translated by Kelsey, F. W., Pompeii: Its Life and Art. New York: Macmillan. (p. 219).

 

II.6 Pompeii. May 2016. Inscription from east side of corridor of Amphitheatre. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

II.6 Pompeii. May 2016. Inscription from east side of corridor of Amphitheatre.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

6 Pompeii. December 2006. Inscription from east side of corridor of Amphitheatre. The inscription reads –
C. CVSPIVS C. F. PANSA PATER D. V. I  D
IIII. QVINQ. PRAEF. ID. EX. D. D. LEGE. PETRON.
One of two inscriptions to father and son, Cuspius Pansa.  
They restored the Amphitheatre at their own expense after the earthquake of AD62.
According to Pagano and Prisciandaro, this read –
C(aius) Cuspius C(ai) f(ilius) Pansa pater d(uum) v(ir) i(ure) d(icundo)
IIII quinq(uennalis) praef(ectus) i(ure) d(icundo) ex d(ecreto) d(ecurionum) lege Petron(i)    [CIL X 858]  See Pagano, M.  and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli.  Naples : Nicola Longobardi. 
(p.110)

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Inscription from east side of corridor of Amphitheatre. The inscription reads –

 

C. CVSPIVS C. F. PANSA PATER D. V. I  D
IIII. QVINQ. PRAEF. ID. EX. D. D. LEGE. PETRON.

 

One of two inscriptions to father and son, Cuspius Pansa. 

They restored the Amphitheatre at their own expense after the earthquake of AD62.

 

According to Pagano and Prisciandaro, this read –

C(aius) Cuspius C(ai) f(ilius) Pansa pater d(uum) v(ir) i(ure) d(icundo)

IIII quinq(uennalis) praef(ectus) i(ure) d(icundo) ex d(ecreto) d(ecurionum) lege Petron(i)    [CIL X 858]

See Pagano, M.  and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli.  Naples : Nicola Longobardi. (p.110)

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Large rectangular niche, on west side of corridor in Amphitheatre.  One of two inscriptions to father and son Cuspius Pansa.  They restored the Amphitheatre at their own expense after the earthquake of AD62.

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006.

Large rectangular niche, on west side of corridor in Amphitheatre. 

One of two inscriptions to father and son Cuspius Pansa. 

They restored the Amphitheatre at their own expense after the earthquake of AD62.

 

II.6 Pompeii. May 2016. Inscription from west side of corridor of Amphitheatre. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

II.6 Pompeii. May 2016. Inscription from west side of corridor of Amphitheatre.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Inscription from west side of corridor of Amphitheatre. The inscription reads –
C. CVSPIVS C. F. PANSA PONTIF.
D. VIR I. D.
One of two inscriptions to father and son, Cuspius Pansa.  
They restored the Amphitheatre at their own expense after the earthquake of AD62.
According to Pagano and Prisciandaro, this read –
C(aius) Cuspius C(ai) f(ilius) {F} Pansa pontif(ex)
d(uum) vir i(ure) d(icundo)    [CIL X 859]
See Pagano, M.  and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli.  Naples : Nicola Longobardi. (p.110)

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Inscription from west side of corridor of Amphitheatre.

The inscription reads –

 

C. CVSPIVS C. F. PANSA PONTIF.
D. VIR I. D.

 

One of two inscriptions to father and son, Cuspius Pansa. 

They restored the Amphitheatre at their own expense after the earthquake of AD62.

 

According to Pagano and Prisciandaro, this read –

C(aius) Cuspius C(ai) f(ilius) {F} Pansa pontif(ex)

d(uum) vir i(ure) d(icundo)    [CIL X 859]

See Pagano, M.  and Prisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli.  Naples : Nicola Longobardi. (p.110)

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Amphitheatre showing holes into which stakes carrying barriers were fitted as a means of dividing the corridor when necessary

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006.

Amphitheatre showing holes into which stakes carrying barriers were fitted as a means of dividing the corridor when necessary.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Looking through the north entrance corridor. The portico entrance of II.5.5 can be seen in the distance.

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Looking north through the north entrance corridor.

The portico entrance of II.5.5 can be seen in the distance.

 

II.6 Pompeii. September 2015. West corridor under Amphitheatre, looking south-west from north entrance corridor.

II.6 Pompeii. September 2015.

West corridor under Amphitheatre, looking south-west from north entrance corridor.

 

II.6. Pompeii. September 2015. Detail of west corridor, visible at far end from north entrance corridor.

II.6. Pompeii. September 2015. Detail of west corridor, visible at far end from north entrance corridor.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. West corridor under Amphitheatre, looking south-west. According to Pagano and Prisciandaro, graffiti were found here, some painted in red and some in black.
Found 24th November 1814 (PAH I, 3,165, III,1) –
Omnia munera vicisti
ton henta theamaton est    [CIL IV 1111 painted in black]
Abdili Eh habes         
te bene                            [CIL IV 1112]
Sabinum                         [CIL IV 1113]
Found 27th November 1814, (PAH I, 3, 165, III,1) painted in red, but hardly readable –
Olio M()
Feliciu
Lyxania
Stephanio
/
Simicrito amor CRINRIN
VAVRIVS                         [CIL IV  1114]
Found 1st December 1814, (PAH I, 3, 166, III,1* - *27th November) painted in red –
Laelius Narcissus occupant    [CIL IV 1115]
Popidium Ruf(um)
A<e=B>dili rei                 [CIL IV 1116]
See Pagano, M. andPrisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples : Nicola Longobardi. (p.112)

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. West corridor under Amphitheatre, looking south-west.

According to Pagano and Prisciandaro, graffiti were found here, some painted in red and some in black.

 

Found 24th November 1814 (PAH I, 3,165, III,1) –

 

Omnia munera vicisti

ton henta theamaton est    [CIL IV 1111 painted in black]

 

Abdili Eh habes        

te bene                            [CIL IV 1112]

 

Sabinum                         [CIL IV 1113]

 

Found 27th November 1814, (PAH I, 3, 165, III,1) painted in red, but hardly readable –

 

Olio M()

Feliciu

Lyxania

Stephanio

/

Simicrito amor CRINRIN

VAVRIVS                         [CIL IV  1114]

 

Found 1st December 1814, (PAH I, 3, 166, III,1* - *27th November) painted in red –

 

Laelius Narcissus occupant    [CIL IV 1115]

 

Popidium Ruf(um)

A<e=B>dili rei                 [CIL IV 1116]

 

See Pagano, M. andPrisciandaro, R., 2006. Studio sulle provenienze degli oggetti rinvenuti negli scavi borbonici del regno di Napoli. Naples : Nicola Longobardi. (p.112)

 

II.6 Pompeii. May 2017.  East corridor under Amphitheatre, looking south-east from north entrance corridor. Photo courtesy of John Puffer.

II.6 Pompeii. May 2017.  

East corridor under Amphitheatre, looking south-east from north entrance corridor.

Photo courtesy of John Puffer.

 

II.6 Pompeii. May 2016.  East corridor under Amphitheatre, looking south-east from north entrance corridor. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

II.6 Pompeii. May 2016.  

East corridor under Amphitheatre, looking south-east from north entrance corridor.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

II.6 Pompeii. September 2015. East corridor under Amphitheatre, looking south-east from north entrance corridor.

II.6 Pompeii. September 2015.

East corridor under Amphitheatre, looking south-east from north entrance corridor.

 

II.6 Pompeii. September 2015. North wall of east corridor under Amphitheatre.

II.6 Pompeii. September 2015. North wall of east corridor under Amphitheatre.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. East corridor under Amphitheatre, looking south-east.

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. East corridor under Amphitheatre, looking south-east.

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Doorway under Amphitheatre, on west side of entrance corridor from north.According to Mau, there are three of these small dark rooms, near the end of the three corridors. Their purpose was unknown, but they may have been storerooms. See Mau, A., 1907, translated by Kelsey, F. W., Pompeii: Its Life and Art. New York: Macmillan. (p. 215-6).

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006.

Doorway to underneath of Amphitheatre, on west side of entrance corridor from north.

According to Mau, there are three of these small dark rooms, near the end of the three corridors.

Their purpose was unknown, but they may have been storerooms.

See Mau, A., 1907, translated by Kelsey, F. W., Pompeii: Its Life and Art. New York: Macmillan. (p. 215-6).

 

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006. Small dark room on west side of entrance corridor of Amphitheatre, possibly a storeroom.

II.6 Pompeii. December 2006.

Small dark room on west side of entrance corridor of Amphitheatre, possibly a storeroom.

 

 

Part:       1        2        3         4        5        6        7_