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V.6.19 Pompeii.

Only the western and southern street fronts have been excavated, c.1902, 1905-8.

 

As this area has not been excavated, it is extremely difficult to see and show exactly where the entrances were.

We have followed the plan as Eschebach drew it in 1969, as best we can.

Until this area is fully excavated, this may or may not be the correct number of entrances.

 

V.6.19 Pompeii. May 2006. Entrance.

V.6.19 Pompeii. May 2006. Entrance.

 

V.6.19 Pompeii. December 2005. Entrance, with street shrine painted on the wall, on left of photo.

V.6.19 Pompeii. December 2005. Entrance, with street shrine painted on the wall, on left of photo.

 

V.6.19 Pompeii. May 2015. Painted lararium on exterior wall. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

V.6.19 Pompeii. May 2015. Painted lararium on exterior wall. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

V.6.19 Pompeii. May 2006. Lararium painted on the wall at V.6.19. 
This shows two serpents approaching an altar that had offerings on it.
In the top left hand side, CIL IV 6641 can be seen, written in the ainted rectangle.  According to Della Corte, the unknown proprietor of the unexcavated house or workshop, had the warning added to the street shrine. The wording, between good wishes and irony, was:
Cacator, sic valeas, ut tu hoc (sic) locum trasia(s)  (= transeas).    [CIL IV 6641]
See Della Corte, M., 1965.  Case ed Abitanti di Pompei. Napoli: Fausto Fiorentino. (p.97)
According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de), it read:
Cacator, si<c=g> valeas
Ut tu hoc locum tra(n)sea(s)    [CIL IV 6641]
See also Spano, in Notizie degli Scavi, 1910, p.262.

V.6.19 Pompeii. May 2006. Lararium painted on the wall at V.6.19.

This shows two serpents moving through plants to an altar that had offerings on it.

In the top left hand side, CIL IV 6641 can be seen, written in the painted rectangle.

 

According to Della Corte, the unknown proprietor of the unexcavated house or workshop, had the warning added to the street shrine.

The wording, between good wishes and irony, was:

Cacator, sic valeas, ut tu hoc (sic) locum trasia(s)  (= transeas).    [CIL IV 6641]

See Della Corte, M., 1965.  Case ed Abitanti di Pompei. Napoli: Fausto Fiorentino. (p.97)

 

According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de), it read:

Cacator, si<c=g> valeas

Ut tu hoc locum tra(n)sea(s)    [CIL IV 6641]

 

See also Spano, in Notizie degli Scavi, 1910, p.262.

 

V.6.19 Pompeii. May 2015. Looking south across unexcavated area, with lararium painted on wall, in lower right. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

V.6.19 Pompeii. May 2015.

Looking south across unexcavated area of Reg. V, with lararium painted on wall, in lower right.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

V.6.19 Pompeii. May 2015. Looking south-west towards lararium on wall, centre left, and remains of Vesuvian Gate, on right. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

V.6.19 Pompeii. May 2015.

Looking south-west towards lararium on wall, centre left, and remains of Vesuvian Gate, on right.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.