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VII.1.25 Pompeii. Casa dei Principi di Russia, Second entrance to VII.1.47 House of Siricus.

Linked to VII.1.46. Excavated 1851, 1857, 1862, and 1872. Restored and reopened 2017.

(Strada Stabiana 57).

According to PAH, the house was excavated on 17th May 1852 in the presence of the Grand Dukes of Russia, the sons of Czar Nicholas I.

See Fiorelli G., 1862. Pompeianarum Antiquitatum Historia Vol 2, 1819 to 1860, p. 524, 17 Maggio 1852.

 

Combined plan of VII.1.25 VII.1.47 and VII.1.46 (opens in new window)      VII.1.47      VII.1.46

 

Please note that the numbers used for the rooms on pompeiiinpictures are based on the combined plan for VII.1.25 and VII.1.47 (see link above) in PPM and not the earlier Niccolini plan shown below.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. 1854 drawing by Giuseppe Abbate of plan and ornamental details from Strada Stabiana Casa No. 57. See Niccolini F, 1854. Le case ed i monumenti di Pompei: Volume Primo. Napoli. Strada Stabiana Casa No. 57, Tav I.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. 1854 drawing by Giuseppe Abbate of plan and ornamental details from Strada Stabiana Casa No. 57.

See Niccolini F, 1854. Le case ed i monumenti di Pompei: Volume Primo. Napoli. Strada Stabiana Casa No. 57, Tav. I.

Key:

1:   VII.1.25 entrance fauces

2:   Shop

3:   Tuscanic atrium

4:   Room with holes in wall where 4 skeletons were found

5:   Room with rough painting of serpents in which a fifth skeleton was found in a tunnel through the wall

6:   Unadorned and rough room with traces of a door in the threshold

7:   Ala with various paintings

8:   Unadorned and rough room with traces of a door in the threshold

9:   Cubiculum with various paintings

10:  Peristyle

11:  Triclinium

12:  Exedra/Tablinum

13:  Cubiculum

14:  Second peristyle on a different level

15:  Cellarium

16:  Kitchen

17:  Reconstruction of roof tiles now in the museum

18:  Roof tile to give light

19:  Roof tile to give light

20:  Tile from angle of roof

21:  Tile from angle of roof

22:  Elegant antefissa

23:  Elegant antefissa

24:  Table from the atrium

25:  Painting from the side of the door of the exedra possibly Alcmaeon killing his mother Eriphyle.

 

Please note however that the numbers used for the rooms on pompeiiinpictures are based on the combined plan for VII.1.25 and VII.1.47 in PPM.

See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 228.

 

According to Breton, this beautiful home, whose main entrance bears the No. 57 on the street of Stabia, was excavated in May 1852 in the presence of the sons of the Emperor of Russia, Nicolas I. Its plan presents a peculiar disposition, motivated no doubt by the shape of the land, which had more width and less depth than that of a regular House of equal importance. The atrium and the peristyle are broader rather than deep, and are separated only by a simple wall instead of by a tablinum and some other parts.

See Breton, Ernest. 1855. Pompeia, decrite et dessine: Seconde edition. Paris, Baudry, pp. 316-7.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. September 2004. Via Stabiana entrance, looking west. The door-jambs were made of brick, and the threshold was made from lava.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. September 2004. Via Stabiana entrance, looking west.

The door-jambs were made of brick, and the threshold was made from lava.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2005. Entrance.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2005. Entrance.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. September 2015. Entrance fauces 23. Looking west from entrance towards atrium, during restoration.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. September 2015.

Entrance fauces 23. Looking west from entrance towards atrium, during restoration.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2006. Looking west through fauces 23 to atrium 24.
According to Breton, via a prothyrum paved in opus signinum patterned symmetrically with small white stones, we enter the Tuscan atrium; at the centre is a very pretty impluvium of marble at the top of which is a covered square cippus of marble with a lead pipe that poured water into a basin.
See Breton, Ernest. 1855. Pompeia, décrite et dessine: Seconde édition . Paris, Baudry, p. 316.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2006. Looking west through fauces 23 to atrium 24.

According to Breton, via a prothyrum paved in opus signinum patterned symmetrically with small white stones, we enter the Tuscan atrium; at the centre is a very pretty impluvium of marble at the top of which is a covered square cippus of marble with a lead pipe that poured water into a basin.

See Breton, Ernest. 1855. Pompeia, décrite et dessine: Seconde édition . Paris, Baudry, p. 316.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2005. Entrance fauces 23. Looking west from entrance towards atrium 24.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2005. Entrance fauces 23. Looking west from entrance towards atrium 24.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking west across impluvium in atrium 24, restored.
Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking west across impluvium in atrium 24, restored.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2006. Looking west across impluvium and marble podium in atrium 24.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2006. Looking west across impluvium and marble podium in atrium 24.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Cistern mouth near impluvium in atrium. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Cistern mouth near impluvium in atrium.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Impluvium in atrium. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Impluvium in atrium. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Detail of impluvium in atrium. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Detail of impluvium in atrium. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking north-east across impluvium in atrium 24. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking north-east across impluvium in atrium 24.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking east across atrium 24. 
The corridor 23 to the entrance at VII.1.25 is on the left, followed by a doorway to a small room 25, centre, and doorway to room 26 in south-east corner of atrium. The doorway to room 29 is to the right.
Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking east across atrium 24.

The corridor 23 to the entrance at VII.1.25 is on the left, followed by a doorway to a small room 25, centre, and doorway to room 26 in south-east corner of atrium.

The doorway to room 29 is to the right.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking east through doorway into small room 25 on south side of entrance corridor. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking east through doorway into small room 25 on south side of entrance corridor.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking east through second doorway into room 26 in south-east corner of atrium. 
Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking east through second doorway into room 26 in south-east corner of atrium.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking south through doorway to room 29 in south-east corner of atrium. 
Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking south through doorway to room 29 in south-east corner of atrium.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking south across threshold to room 29 in south-east corner of atrium.  Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking south across threshold to room 29 in south-east corner of atrium.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking south-east across room 29 in south-east corner of atrium.  Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking south-east across room 29 in south-east corner of atrium.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking south-east across atrium 24 to rooms 29 and 30. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking south-east across atrium 24 to rooms 29 and 30.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. 2005. Looking south across impluvium and marble podium in atrium 24.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. 2005. Looking south across impluvium and marble podium in atrium 24.

 

VI.1.25 Pompeii. 1957. Atrium 24. South side of table near impluvium, with podium. Looking north.
According to Breton, there was a marble impluvium, a square cippus of marble, a basin on a small base of marble adorned with large acanthus leaves and a white marble table engraved with the number LXXIX.
See Breton, Ernest. 1855. Pompeia, décrite et dessine: Seconde édition . Paris, Baudry, p. 316.
Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J57f0124

VI.1.25 Pompeii. 1957. Atrium 24. South side of table near impluvium, with podium. Looking north.

According to Breton, there was a marble impluvium, a square cippus of marble, a basin on a small base of marble adorned with large acanthus leaves and a white marble table engraved with the number LXXIX.

See Breton, Ernest. 1855. Pompeia, décrite et dessine: Seconde édition. Paris, Baudry, p. 316.

Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J57f0124

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. Old undated 19th century photo. Looking north-west across atrium 24. 
According to Breton, via a prothyrum paved in opus signinum patterned symmetrically with small white stones, we enter the Tuscan atrium; at the centre is a very pretty impluvium of marble at the top of which is a covered square cippus of marble with a lead pipe who poured water into a basin on a small base of marble adorned with large acanthus leaves. The fountain is accompanied by a white marble table with two feet of very fine workmanship, each composed of the anterior part of a chimera and a griffon. On the side top of the table is engraved the number LXXIX and we found a small bronze group representing Hercules armed with his club and a young Phrygian kneeling in front of him.
See Breton, Ernest. 1855. Pompeia, décrite et dessine: Seconde édition . Paris, Baudry, p. 316.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. Old undated 19th century photo. Looking north-west across atrium 24.

According to Breton, via a prothyrum paved in opus signinum patterned symmetrically with small white stones, we enter the Tuscan atrium; at the centre is a very pretty impluvium of marble at the top of which is a covered square cippus of marble with a lead pipe that poured water into a basin on a small base of marble adorned with large acanthus leaves. The fountain is accompanied by a white marble table with two feet of very fine workmanship, each composed of the anterior part of a chimera and a griffon. On the side top of the table is engraved the number LXXIX and we found a small bronze group representing Hercules armed with his club and a young Phrygian kneeling in front of him.

See Breton, Ernest. 1855. Pompeia, décrite et dessine: Seconde édition. Paris, Baudry, p. 316.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2006. Looking west across atrium through peristyle 31 to exedra 33 and triclinium 32.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2006. Looking west across atrium through peristyle 31 to exedra 33 and triclinium 32.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2006. Looking west from atrium across peristyle, towards triclinium 32.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2006. Looking west from atrium across peristyle, towards triclinium 32.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking towards north-west corner of atrium. 
On the left is the entrance to the peristyle 31, and on the right are the doorways to rooms 28 and 27, on the north side of the atrium 24.
Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking towards north-west corner of atrium.

On the left is the entrance to the peristyle 31, and on the right, are the doorways to rooms 28 and 27, on the north side of the atrium 24.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. Old undated 19th century photo. Looking north-west across atrium 24 through peristyle 31 to triclinium 32. 
The marble tables, 24 on the Niccolini plan, can be seen on the impluvium.
Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. Old undated 19th century photo. Looking north-west across atrium 24 through peristyle 31 to triclinium 32.

The marble tables, 24 on the Niccolini plan, can be seen on the impluvium.

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. 
Remains of painted fourth style plaster (as can be seen in photo above this one) on west wall in north-west corner of atrium 24. 
Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017.

Remains of painted fourth style plaster (as can be seen in photo above this one) on west wall in north-west corner of atrium 24.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Doorway to small room 28 in north-west corner of atrium.  
Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Doorway to small room 28 in north-west corner of atrium. 

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. South-west corner of small room 28 in north-west corner of atrium.  Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. South-west corner of small room 28 in north-west corner of atrium. 

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Remains of painted decoration in small room 28 in north-west corner of atrium, on west and north wall.  Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017.

Remains of painted decoration in small room 28 in north-west corner of atrium, on west and north wall. 

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Remains of painted decoration in small room 28 in north-west corner of atrium, on north and east wall.  Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017.

Remains of painted decoration in small room 28 in north-west corner of atrium, on north and east wall. 

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. 1852 painting of north wall of room 28 in north-west corner of atrium.  
See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 320. 
See Zahn, W., 1852. Die schönsten Ornamente und merkwürdigsten Gemälde aus Pompeji, Herkulanum und Stabiae: III. Berlin: Reimer. Taf. 77.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. 1852 painting of north wall of room 28 in north-west corner of atrium. 

See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 320.

See Zahn, W., 1852. Die schönsten Ornamente und merkwürdigsten Gemälde aus Pompeji, Herkulanum und Stabiae: III. Berlin: Reimer. Taf. 77.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. c.1915 photo. Looking west across atrium 24 through peristyle 31 to exedra 33. 
Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

According to Breton [1855], a large doorway gives entry to the large peristyle of 14 m 10 and 11 metres deep; It was supported by ten columns, which still carry a fragment of entablature. In the right corner is a recess, a kind of cabinet, where we found a few small terracotta vases. The walls of the peristyle were decorated with alternately red and yellow panels with figures of Diana, of Leto, of victories, Bacchae, etc. Right at the bottom of the peristyle are a triclinium where are the weak remnants of two geniuses and a Greyhound and in the Middle a small oecus preceded by two ornate pillars of rich arabesques of a style a lot less light than in other buildings in Pompeii. On the left wall was a mediocre but interesting painting by the subject in which Mr. Minervini recognizes Alcmaeon killing his mother Eriphyle; This painting has been removed [to the Naples Museum]. Finally to the left of the oecus, in a small room, are several heads in medallions and three paintings, Venus and Adonis, Diane and Endymion, and a scene in which the same scientist saw Orestes and Pylades recognized by Iphigenia, and thinking about the means to flee the Tauride; We thought ourselves that she was rather Leda and the Dioscuri, a subject that seemed more in relation to the mythological compositions that surround it; today a further assumption is issued by Mr. Ed. Brizio; the absence of heroic costume, the hue of realism that dominates in this composition make him think that the seated figure that it took for a woman is something else that a magistrate dressed in gown listening to two litigants, and Mr. Minervini agreed with this opinion.
See Breton, Ernest. 1855. Pompeia, décrite et dessine: Seconde édition . Paris, Baudry, p. 316.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. c.1915 photo. Looking west across atrium 24 through peristyle 31 to exedra 33.

Photo courtesy of Rick Bauer.

 

According to Breton [1855], a large doorway gives entry to the large peristyle of 14 m 10 and 11 metres deep; It was supported by ten columns, which still carry a fragment of entablature. In the right corner is a recess, a kind of cabinet, where we found a few small terracotta vases. The walls of the peristyle were decorated with alternately red and yellow panels with figures of Diana, of Leto, of victories, Bacchae, etc. Right at the bottom of the peristyle are a triclinium where are the weak remnants of two geniuses and a Greyhound and in the Middle a small oecus preceded by two ornate pillars of rich arabesques of a style a lot less light than in other buildings in Pompeii. On the left wall was a mediocre but interesting painting by the subject in which Mr. Minervini recognizes Alcmaeon killing his mother Eriphyle; This painting has been removed [to the Naples Museum]. Finally to the left of the oecus, in a small room, are several heads in medallions and three paintings, Venus and Adonis, Diana and Endymion, and a scene in which the same scientist saw Orestes and Pylades recognized by Iphigenia, and thinking about the means to flee the Tauride; We thought ourselves that she was rather Leda and the Dioscuri, a subject that seemed more in relation to the mythological compositions that surround it; today a further assumption is issued by Mr. Ed. Brizio; the absence of heroic costume, the hue of realism that dominates in this composition make him think that the seated figure that it took for a woman is something else that a magistrate dressed in gown listening to two litigants, and Mr. Minervini agreed with this opinion.

See Breton, Ernest. 1855. Pompeia, décrite et dessine: Seconde édition. Paris, Baudry, p. 316.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking south across peristyle 31 after restoration and with new roof. 
Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking south across peristyle 31 after restoration and with new roof.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking south-west across peristyle 31. 
On the west side of the peristyle are three rooms, a cubiculum 34, an exedra 33 and a triclinium 32.
Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking south-west across peristyle 31.

On the west side of the peristyle are three rooms, a cubiculum 34, an exedra 33 and a triclinium 32.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. 1966. Looking west from atrium 24 into peristyle 31.  Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J66f0383

VII.1.25 Pompeii. 1966. Looking west from atrium 24 into peristyle 31.  Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J66f0383 

 

VI.1.25 Pompeii. 1957. Column in peristyle 31.
Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
J57f0122

VI.1.25 Pompeii. 1957. Column in peristyle 31.

Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J57f0122

 

VI.1.25 Pompeii. 1853. Drawing titled House at Pompeii excavated for the visit of the Imperial Russian Princes.
From The Illustrated London News, 30th April 1853, p. 329.
On the 14th April from Naples our own correspondent reported that 
“As we entered the Stabian Street we observed on either side a series of dwellings, ………… We next proceeded to the most important house yet found in this street, and which had been lately excavated for the Imperial Princes of Russia (See Illustration). You enter a wide portico of the ostarius, paved with marble, where an elegant table of the same material is placed. The clawed legs of this table are carved with fruits, and the form is very elegant. You then come upon the atrium, with the usual impluvium. None of the surrounding columns is perfect; and only one of the capitals was found, which is rather grotesque than classical. The circular object near one of the columns is a Well, fluted all round, the rim of which bears traces of having been much used. The alae or wings of this dwelling occur at the further end. The centre room is large, and might have been used as a triclinium. It is decorated with those floral romances and architectural illusions which glitter brightly on the walls of Pompeii. This room opens into two smaller apartments – one on the left, and one on the right – nearly destroyed. The main wall on the right contains a niche with steps, but no statue was found. The present dwelling, like most of the houses of Pompeii, had evidently been well rifled by the ancients. Some copper kitchen utensils and a few unimportant marble decorative garden sculptures are all that was found in a dwelling of so much importance. *”

Footnote: 
* “The small objects found at Pompeii are always removed to the Museum of Naples. Up to the present time no attempt has been made to restore a house and furnish it, although so much material exists for so doing.”

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

VI.1.25 Pompeii. 1853. Drawing titled House at Pompeii excavated for the visit of the Imperial Russian Princes.

From The Illustrated London News, 30th April 1853, p. 329.

On the 14th April from Naples our own correspondent reported that

“As we entered the Stabian Street we observed on either side a series of dwellings, ………… We next proceeded to the most important house yet found in this street, and which had been lately excavated for the Imperial Princes of Russia (See Illustration). You enter a wide portico of the ostarius, paved with marble, where an elegant table of the same material is placed. The clawed legs of this table are carved with fruits, and the form is very elegant. You then come upon the atrium, with the usual impluvium. None of the surrounding columns is perfect; and only one of the capitals was found, which is rather grotesque than classical. The circular object near one of the columns is a Well, fluted all round, the rim of which bears traces of having been much used. The alae or wings of this dwelling occur at the further end. The centre room is large, and might have been used as a triclinium. It is decorated with those floral romances and architectural illusions which glitter brightly on the walls of Pompeii. This room opens into two smaller apartments – one on the left, and one on the right – nearly destroyed. The main wall on the right contains a niche with steps, but no statue was found. The present dwelling, like most of the houses of Pompeii, had evidently been well rifled by the ancients. Some copper kitchen utensils and a few unimportant marble decorative garden sculptures are all that was found in a dwelling of so much importance. *”

 

Footnote:

* “The small objects found at Pompeii are always removed to the Museum of Naples. Up to the present time no attempt has been made to restore a house and furnish it, although so much material exists for so doing.”

 

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

According to Breton many of the roof tiles contained the name of the maker N. Sabinus.

See Breton, Ernest. 1855. Pompeia, décrite et dessine: Seconde édition. Paris, Baudry, p. 317.

 

VI.1.25 Pompeii. 1853. Drawing titled Roof Excavation Near the Gate of Stabia.
From The Illustrated London News, 30th April 1853, p. 329.
On the 14th April from Naples our own correspondent reported that “Threading our way through the back doorway of this house, we came upon the most remarkable discovery which has yet taken place, viz., the complete roofing of a house, of which I send you a drawing. It will be remembered that Pompeii having been destroyed by falling ashes, and then covered by earth, was the occasion of the roofs falling in. The very little care used in clearing away the incumbent earth has left us in the dark about the construction of ancient roofings. Here, then, for the first time, we have a complete roof of a house formed of square tiles, about twelve inches by twelve, with coping tiles running between them; and over the back-bone, so to speak, of the construction, a cement was used to make the roofing water-tight. So perfect is the roof, that it might have been constructed yesterday, and it would suit an English cottage.”
Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

VI.1.25 Pompeii. 1853. Drawing titled Roof Excavation Near the Gate of Stabia.

From The Illustrated London News, 30th April 1853, p. 329.

On the 14th April from Naples our own correspondent reported that “Threading our way through the back doorway of this house, we came upon the most remarkable discovery which has yet taken place, viz., the complete roofing of a house, of which I send you a drawing. It will be remembered that Pompeii having been destroyed by falling ashes, and then covered by earth, was the occasion of the roofs falling in. The very little care used in clearing away the incumbent earth has left us in the dark about the construction of ancient roofings. Here, then, for the first time, we have a complete roof of a house formed of square tiles, about twelve inches by twelve, with coping tiles running between them; and over the back-bone, so to speak, of the construction, a cement was used to make the roofing water-tight. So perfect is the roof, that it might have been constructed yesterday, and it would suit an English cottage.”

Photo courtesy of Drew Baker.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. Peristyle 31. 1854 drawing by Giuseppe Abbate of Armed Victory in flight and frieze portraying goats.
See Niccolini F, 1854. Le case ed i monumenti di Pompei: Volume Primo. Napoli. Strada Stabiana Casa No. 57, Tav II.
See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 330.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. Peristyle 31. 1854 drawing by Giuseppe Abbate of Armed Victory in flight and frieze portraying goats.

See Niccolini F, 1854. Le case ed i monumenti di Pompei: Volume Primo. Napoli. Strada Stabiana Casa No. 57, Tav II.

See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 330.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. 1854 drawing by Giuseppe Abbate of decorative motifs from a fresco on the piers of exedra 33.
Niccolini reports a hundred other “rabeschi” (a type of ornamentation that consists of geometric designs or repetitive stylized plants).
See Niccolini F, 1854. Le case ed i monumenti di Pompei: Volume Primo. Napoli. Strada Stabiana Casa No. 57, Tav III.
See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 338.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. 1854 drawing by Giuseppe Abbate of decorative motifs from a fresco on the piers of exedra 33.

Niccolini reports a hundred other “rabeschi” (a type of ornamentation that consists of geometric designs or repetitive stylized plants).

See Niccolini F, 1854. Le case ed i monumenti di Pompei: Volume Primo. Napoli. Strada Stabiana Casa No. 57, Tav III.

See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 338.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. September 2015. Looking across atrium towards exedra 33, during restoration.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. September 2015. Looking across atrium towards exedra 33, during restoration.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. 2013. Exedra 33, during restoration.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. 2013. Exedra 33, during restoration.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. Exedra 33. Painting of Alcmaeon killing his mother Eriphyle.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8994.
See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 341.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. Exedra 33. Painting of Alcmaeon killing his mother Eriphyle.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 8994.

See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 341.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking south across peristyle 31 to doorway of room 34.
According to Niccolini this was a cubiculum but PPM simply describes it as a room. 
Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.
See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 345. 
See Niccolini F, 1854. Le case ed i monumenti di Pompei: Volume Primo. Napoli. Strada Stabiana Casa No. 57, Tav. I.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. May 2017. Looking south across peristyle 31 to doorway of room 34.

According to Niccolini this was a cubiculum but PPM simply describes it as a room.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 345.

See Niccolini F, 1854. Le case ed i monumenti di Pompei: Volume Primo. Napoli. Strada Stabiana Casa No. 57, Tav. I.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. Room 34, south wall. Copy by G. Abbate of painting of Mars and Venus or Venus and Adonis.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.  Inventory number ADS 512.
See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 349.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. Room 34, south wall. Copy by G. Abbate of painting of Mars and Venus or Venus and Adonis.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number ADS 512.

See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 349.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. Room 34. 1852. According to PPM, this Zahn illustration combines elements from different walls.
The central painting is of Selene and Endymion.
The medallion of the left is a bust of a virile male and the medallion on the right is a bust of Paris.
See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 350. 
See Zahn, W., 1852. Die schönsten Ornamente und merkwürdigsten Gemälde aus Pompeji, Herkulanum und Stabiae: III. Berlin: Reimer. Taf. 79.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. Room 34. 1852. According to PPM, this Zahn illustration combines elements from different walls.

The central painting is of Selene and Endymion.

The medallion of the left is a bust of a virile male and the medallion on the right is a bust of Paris.

See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 350.

See Zahn, W., 1852. Die schönsten Ornamente und merkwürdigsten Gemälde aus Pompeji, Herkulanum und Stabiae: III. Berlin: Reimer. Taf. 79.

 

VII.1.25 Pompeii. Room 34. Copy by G. Abbate of painting of Selene and Endymion.
See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 353.

VII.1.25 Pompeii. Room 34. Copy by G. Abbate of painting of Selene and Endymion.

See Carratelli, G. P., 1990-2003. Pompei: Pitture e Mosaici: Vol. VI.  Roma: Istituto della enciclopedia italiana, p. 353.

 

 

Combined plan of VII.1.25 VII.1.47 and VII.1.46 (opens in new window)      VII.1.47      VII.1.46