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VII.7.29 Pompeii. Forum Holitorium, Foro Olitorio, Forum Venale, Horrea Granariorum, Grain market, Vegetable market, Granai del Foro, Granai Pubblici, Granaio, Poecile, School, Scuola.

Now roofed and used as a deposito, a storage and display area.

Excavated 1816, 1822.

 

Part 1    Part 2   Part 3   Part 4

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. Looking south along front of pillars. Photo Wikispaces.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. Looking south along front of pillars. Photo Wikispaces.

According to the web site of the Soprintendenza, “the building, narrow and elongated in shape, defines a stretch of the West side of the Civil Forum of Pompeii. It is shaped with a unique hall of considerable height, divided into two spaces by short cross walls. The facade on the Forum consists of a series of 'opus latericium' pillars flanking eight entrances. Inside, the building has a clay floor and does not preserve traces of wall coating. It is traditionally interpreted as a covered area for the sale of cereals and pulses”.

See http://pompei.sns.it/prado_front_end/index.php?page=Home&id=6536&lang=en

 

It has also been considered a space for public leisure. 19th century scholars saw a similarity with the Stoà Poikile in the ancient Agorà of Athens, hence they gave VII.7.29 the name poecile. They believed it had been a covered area, maybe decorated with paintings, where citizens could safely meet and walk.

See Mazois, F., 1829. Les Ruines de Pompei: Troisieme Partie. Paris: Didot Freres, pp. 57f.

 

More recently it has been suggested it was a public school. An inscription written by the master Sema was found on the nearby south-east corner of the precinct of the Temple of Apollo.

According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de) this read

 

Iulium Simplicem / aed(ilem) v(iis) a(aedibus) s(acris) p(ublicis) p(rocurandis) v(irum) b(onum) d(ignum) r(ei) p(ublicae) o(ro) v(os) f(aciatis) Sema / cum pueris / rog(at)      [CIL IV, 668]

 

According to Bradley, this translates to

 

Teacher Sema with his boys, recommends Julius Simplex for the job.

 

See Bradley, P., 2013. Cities of Vesuvius: Pompeii and Herculaneum, 2nd Ed., Melbourne: Cambridge U.P., p. 118.

 

The building is also very similar to the porticoed building in a school scene in a painting now in Naples Archaeological Museum.

See Van Buren A. W., 1918. Studies in the archaeology of the Forum at Pompeii, MAAR 11, p. 74.

 

The building is spacious and high, and is also positioned next to the mensa ponderaria, the weights and measures bench, with bowls used as standards for liquid and dry measures, and which was usually placed close to a market. The building is currently identified as the forum holitorium, mainly devoted to the storage and sale of corn and legumes.

See Dyer, T., 1868. Pompeii: its history. Buildings and antiquities. London: Bell & Dandy, p. 110f.

 

According to De Sanctis, the lack of a way of isolating food from moisture, insects and rodents may mean it was a market and not a storage area. Its location means it would have been well heated in winter and hot in summer, so vegetable and farm products would have been sold in a single day.

See http://pompei.sns.it/uploads/2012_09_6_13_44_43.pdf

 

II.4.3 Pompeii. Part of the “Forum Frieze” found in the atrium of II.4.3.  
The punishment of a scholar, the painting that suggested VII.7.29 may be a public school.
Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.  Inventory number 9066.

II.4.3 Pompeii. Part of the “Forum Frieze” found in the atrium of II.4.3. 

The punishment of a scholar, the painting that suggested VII.7.29 may have been a public school.

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum. Inventory number 9066.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii.  May 2006. Items in storage.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2006. Items in storage.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2015. Items in storage. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2015. Items in storage. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2015. Items in storage. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2015. Items in storage. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2011. Items in storage. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2011. Items in storage. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2011. Items in storage. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2011. Items in storage. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2011. Items in storage. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2011. Items in storage. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2006. Capitals and other items in storage.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2006. Capitals and other items in storage.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii.  May 2006. Items in storage.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2006. Items in storage.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii.  May 2006. Items in storage.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2006. Items in storage.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2002. Looking north across items in storage. Photo courtesy of David Hingston.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2002. Looking north across items in storage. Photo courtesy of David Hingston.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. October 2001. Looking north across items in storage. Photo courtesy of Peter Woods.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. October 2001. Looking north across items in storage. Photo courtesy of Peter Woods.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2015. Cart and other items in storage. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2015. Cart and other items in storage. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2015. Left front wheel of cart. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2015. Left front wheel of cart. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2015. Left rear wheel of cart. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2015. Left rear wheel of cart. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2015. Right wheels of cart. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2015. Right wheels of cart. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2015. Detail of right rear wheel. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2015. Detail of right rear wheel of cart. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2018. Items in storage. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2018. Items in storage. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2018. Item in storage. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2018. Item in storage. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. September 2015. Items in storage.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. September 2015. Item in storage.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2011. Items in storage. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2011. Item in storage. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. September 2015. Items in storage.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. September 2015. Item in storage.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. Items on display and in storage. Photographed 1970-79 by Günther Einhorn, picture courtesy of his son Ralf Einhorn.
According to Garcia y Garcia, it was Maiuri that restored the pilasters of this building and formed it into a display area. Mostly these items on display are clay amphorae and domestic items from the houses, shops and workshops. For the most part without provenance and classified only by type and form. The bombing of 13th September 1943 caused the demolition of the south and part of the west wall, and at least two of the seven pilasters of the entrance doorways. In 1946 Maiuri again restored the pilasters and roof.
See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p.116-7)

VII.7.29 Pompeii. Items on display and in storage.

Photographed 1970-79 by Günther Einhorn, picture courtesy of his son Ralf Einhorn.

According to Garcia y Garcia, it was Maiuri that restored the pilasters of this building and formed it into a display area.

Mostly these items on display are clay amphorae and domestic items from the houses, shops and workshops.

For the most part without provenance and classified only by type and form.

The bombing of 13th September 1943 caused the demolition of the south perimeter and part of the west wall

At least two of the seven pilasters of the entrance doorways were also demolished.

In 1946 Maiuri again restored the pilasters and roof.

See Garcia y Garcia, L., 2006. Danni di guerra a Pompei. Rome: L’Erma di Bretschneider. (p.116-7)

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2011. Plaster cast of body. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns

VII.7.29 Pompeii. May 2011. Plaster cast of body. Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. October 2001. Plaster cast of body. Photo courtesy of Peter Woods.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. October 2001. Plaster cast of body. Photo courtesy of Peter Woods.

 

VII.7.29 Pompeii. October 2001. Looking south across items in storage. Photo courtesy of Peter Woods.

VII.7.29 Pompeii. October 2001. Looking south across items in storage.

Photo courtesy of Peter Woods.

 

 

Part 1    Part 2   Part 3   Part 4

 

 

 

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Ultimo aggiornamento - Last updated: 22-Oct-2018 14:43