PompeiiinPictures

VII.9.1 Pompeii. Edificio di Eumachia. Eumachia’s Building.

Excavated 1814, 1817, 1836.

 

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VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico, forming part of the colonnade of the Forum. This has fragments of an inscription on the frieze above. (CIL X, 810, 811). The full Latin inscription, which was also recorded at VII.9.67,  was 
EUMACHIA L F SACERD[os] PUBL[ica], NOMINE SUO ET M NUMISTRI FRONTONIS FILI CHACIDICUM, CRYPTAM, PORTICUS CONCORDIAE AUGUSTAE PIETATI SUA PEQUNIA FECIT CADEMQUE DEDICAVIT.
Eumachia, daughter of Lucius, public priestess, in her own name and that of her son, Marcus Numistrius Fronto, built at her own expense the colonnade, corridor and portico in honour of Augustan Concord and Piety and also dedicated them.  See Cooley, A. and M.G.L., 2004. Pompeii : A Sourcebook. London : Routledge. (p.100, E42)  See Mau, A., 1907, translated by Kelsey F. W. Pompeii: Its Life and Art. New York: Macmillan. (p.111).

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico, forming part of the colonnade of the Forum.

This has fragments of an inscription on the frieze above. (CIL X, 810, 811). The full Latin inscription, which was also recorded at VII.9.67, was

EUMACHIA L F SACERD[os] PUBL[ica], NOMINE SUO ET M NUMISTRI FRONTONIS FILI CHACIDICUM, CRYPTAM, PORTICUS CONCORDIAE AUGUSTAE PIETATI SUA PEQUNIA FECIT CADEMQUE DEDICAVIT.

Eumachia, daughter of Lucius, public priestess, in her own name and that of her son, Marcus Numistrius Fronto, built at her own expense the colonnade, corridor and portico in honour of Augustan Concord and Piety and also dedicated them.

See Cooley, A. and M.G.L., 2004. Pompeii: A Sourcebook. London: Routledge. (p. 100, E42)

See Mau, A., 1907, translated by Kelsey F. W. Pompeii: Its Life and Art. New York: Macmillan. (p. 111).

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. 1964. Looking towards the east side of the Forum. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
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VII.9.1 Pompeii. 1964. Looking towards the east side of the Forum. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J64f1220

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. North part.

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. North part.

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. North part with part of inscription above.

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. North part with part of inscription above.

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. South part with part of inscription above.

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. South part with part of inscription above.

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. 1964. Looking north-east towards the portico of Eumachia’s building. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
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VII.9.1 Pompeii. 1964. Looking north-east towards the portico of Eumachia’s building. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J64f1219

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. Looking north.

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. Looking north.

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. 1964. Portico of Eumachia’s building. Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.
Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.
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VII.9.1 Pompeii. 1964. Portico of Eumachia’s building.  Photo by Stanley A. Jashemski.

Source: The Wilhelmina and Stanley A. Jashemski archive in the University of Maryland Library, Special Collections (See collection page) and made available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial License v.4. See Licence and use details.

J64f1222

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. Part of inscription.

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. Part of inscription.

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. Part of inscription.

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. Part of inscription.

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. Part of inscription.

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. Part of inscription.

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. Part of inscription.

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. Part of inscription.

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. Part of inscription.

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. Part of inscription.

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. Part of inscription.

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2010. Eumachia’s Building portico. Part of inscription.

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. September 2005. Portico 1. North end. Large niche 5. Small doorway to stairs, leading up to large niche on platform.

VII.9.1 Pompeii. September 2005. Portico 1. North end. Large niche 5.

Small doorway to stairs, leading up to large niche on platform.

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. September 2005. Portico 1. North end. Small niche 2. Small niche between large niche 5 and apsidal niche 4.

VII.9.1 Pompeii. September 2005. Portico 1. North end. Small niche 2.

Small niche between large niche 5 and apsidal niche 4.

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. September 2005. Portico 1. North end. Apsidal niche 4.

VII.9.1 Pompeii. September 2005. Portico 1. North end. Apsidal niche 4.

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. September 2005. Portico 1. North end. 
Small niche between entrance and apsidal niche 4.

VII.9.1 Pompeii. September 2005. Portico 1. North end. Small niche between entrance and apsidal niche 4.

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. September 2005. Portico 1. North end. 
Plaque to Romulus, son of Mars, situated below niche between entrance and apsidal niche 4.
ROMULUS MARTIS FILIUS URBEM ROMAE CONDIDET ET REGNAUIT ANNOS DUODEQUADRAGINTA…..
See Engelmann, W., 1929. New Guide to Pompeii: Second Edition. Engelmann. (p.170)
According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de) this reads

Romulus Martis
[f]ilius urbem Romam
[condi]dit et regnavit annos
duodequadraginta isque
primus dux duce hostium
Acrone rege Caeninensium
interfecto spolia opi[ma]
Iovi Feretrio consecra[vit]
receptusque in deoru[m]
numerum Quirinu[s]
appellatu[s est]      [CIL X 809]

According to Cooley this translates as

“Romulus, son of Mars, founded the city of Rome and reigned for 38 years;
he was the first general to dedicate the enemy spoils (spolia opima) to Jupiter Feretrius, 
having slain the enemy’s general, King Acro of the Caeninenses,
and, having been received among the company of the gods, was called Quirinus”.

See Pompeii, A Sourcebook by Alison Cooley, (p.101), E45, CIL X 809 = ILS 64.

VII.9.1 Pompeii. September 2005. Portico 1. North end.

Plaque to Romulus, son of Mars, situated below niche between entrance and apsidal niche 4.

ROMULUS MARTIS FILIUS URBEM ROMAE CONDIDET ET REGNAUIT ANNOS DUODEQUADRAGINTA…..

See Engelmann, W., 1929. New Guide to Pompeii: Second Edition. Engelmann. (p.170)

According to Epigraphik-Datenbank Clauss/Slaby (See www.manfredclauss.de) this reads

 

Romulus Martis

[f]ilius urbem Romam

[condi]dit et regnavit annos

duodequadraginta isque

primus dux duce hostium

Acrone rege Caeninensium

interfecto spolia opi[ma]

Iovi Feretrio consecra[vit]

receptusque in deoru[m]

numerum Quirinu[s]

appellatu[s est]      [CIL X 809]

 

According to Cooley this translates as

 

“Romulus, son of Mars, founded the city of Rome and reigned for 38 years;

he was the first general to dedicate the enemy spoils (spolia opima) to Jupiter Feretrius,

having slain the enemy’s general, King Acro of the Caeninenses,

and, having been received among the company of the gods, was called Quirinus”.

 

See Pompeii: A Sourcebook by Alison Cooley, (p.101), E45, CIL X 809 = ILS 64.

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2015. Portico 1. North end. Plaque to Romulus, son of Mars, situated below niche between entrance and apsidal niche 4. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

VII.9.1 Pompeii. May 2015. Portico 1. North end.

Plaque to Romulus, son of Mars, situated below niche between entrance and apsidal niche 4. Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

VII.9.1 Pompeii, January 1977. Portico and entrance doorway to Eumachia Building on east side of Forum. Photo courtesy of David Hingston.

VII.9.1 Pompeii, January 1977. Portico and entrance doorway to Eumachia Building on east side of Forum.

Photo courtesy of David Hingston.

 

 

Part 2      Part 3      Part 4      Part 5      Part 6      Part 7      Plan (Opens in separate window)

 

 

 

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Ultimo aggiornamento - Last updated: 22-Oct-2018 14:43