PompeiiinPictures

IX.7.23 Pompeii. Caupona of T Claudius Epaphroditus. Excavated 1879.

 

IX.7.23 Pompeii. May 2005. Looking south to entrance. On the left of the photo, against the east wall was the site of the steps to the upper floor.
Beneath the stairs was the latrine.

IX.7.23 Pompeii. May 2005. Looking south to entrance.

On the left of the photo, against the east wall was the site of the stairs to the upper floor, above the remaining stone step.

According to Mau, the stairs would seem to have been made of wood other than the lower stone one.

On the left was also the site of the latrine, originally hidden by a thin wall.

 

IX.7.23 Pompeii. May 2005. Looking south across caupona to narrow rear room. According to Mau, immediately behind the threshold of the main room, lay a large stone square block of travertine (0.90 long, 0.58 wide and 0.46 high). He thought this probably served as the base for a wooden table, around which the customers would settle down to eat. He also said the threshold of this main room seemed to have been made of wood. See Mau in BdI, 1882, (p.183)
According to Eschebach, the podium used to be on the west side (right of photo) of the caupona, the rear room had the hearth and a window looking into the caupona. See Eschebach, L., 1993. Gebäudeverzeichnis und Stadtplan der antiken Stadt Pompeji. Köln: Böhlau. (p.435)

According to Della Corte, this caupona was attributed to Ti. Claudio Epafrodito, because of the seal/signet brought to light here –
Ti. C(laudius) Ep(aphroditus)    [CIL X 8058,9]. 
He was well noted as producer of wine, one of his numerous named amphora was found in an adjacent atrium.  See Della Corte, M., 1965.  Case ed Abitanti di Pompei. Napoli: Fausto Fiorentino. (S.27 on p.197)

IX.7.23 Pompeii. May 2005. Looking south across caupona to narrow rear room.

According to Mau, immediately behind the threshold of the main room, lay a large stone square block of travertine (0.90 long, 0.58 wide and 0.46 high).

He thought this probably served as the base for a wooden table, around which the customers would settle down to eat.

He also said the threshold of this main room seemed to have been made of wood.

See Mau in BdI, 1882 (p.183)

According to Eschebach, the podium used to be on the west side (right of photo) of the caupona, the rear room had the hearth and a window looking into the caupona.

See Eschebach, L., 1993. Gebäudeverzeichnis und Stadtplan der antiken Stadt Pompeji. Köln: Böhlau. (p.435)

 

According to Della Corte, this caupona was attributed to Ti. Claudio Epafrodito, because of the seal/signet brought to light here –

Ti. C(laudius) Ep(aphroditus)    [CIL X 8058,9].

He was well noted as producer of wine, one of his numerous named amphora was found in an adjacent atrium.

See Della Corte, M., 1965.  Case ed Abitanti di Pompei. Napoli: Fausto Fiorentino. (S.27 on p.197)

 

IX.7.23 Pompeii. May 2005. Looking north across caupona, from rear room.

IX.7.23 Pompeii. May 2005. Looking north across caupona, from rear room.

 

Marble statuette of Iside-Io? Found in IX.7.23, according to Naples Museum card.  Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.  Inventory number 119584. According to Jashemski and Dwyer, this was found in the atrium of IX.7.20, but probably belonged to the peristyle. It was discovered on 28th October 1880, and described as –
Bust for a herm. White marble. Height m.0.21.
The back of the bust is flat and the sides show cuttings for cross-bars.
A river god, with bull’s horns protruding from above temples.
Hair parted down the middle, descends in wavy tresses to chest.
See Jashemski, W. F., 1993. The Gardens of Pompeii, Volume II: Appendices. New York: Caratzas. (p.241)
See Dwyer, Pompeian Domestic Sculpture, pp.71-78.

Marble statuette of Iside-Io? Found in IX.7.23, according to Naples Museum card. 

Now in Naples Archaeological Museum.  Inventory number 119584.

According to Jashemski and Dwyer, this was found in the atrium of IX.7.20, but probably belonged to the peristyle.

It was discovered on 28th October 1880, and described as –

Bust for a herm. White marble. Height m.0.21.

The back of the bust is flat and the sides show cuttings for cross-bars.

A river god, with bull’s horns protruding from above temples.

Hair parted down the middle, descends in wavy tresses to chest.

See Jashemski, W. F., 1993. The Gardens of Pompeii, Volume II: Appendices. New York: Caratzas. (p.241)

See Dwyer, Pompeian Domestic Sculpture, pp.71-78.